Types of Winter Safety Tips for Children

Not every type of winter hazard is applicable to every child, but understanding the basic risks and how to minimize them can help parents protect their children from the ravages of winter. See more tips from AAP below.

Playing Outside

The cold temperatures and biting winds are the most obvious hazards when children play in the snow. Children who are not prepared for winter climates can suffer frostbite, hypothermia and severe chills that can lead to illness, poor judgment and even permanent injury. To avoid the dangers of cold weather:

  • Dress in multiple layers to play outside, including extra layers for legs, feet and hands.
  • Always wear hats and gloves when playing outdoors in cold weather; the biggest proportions of body heat are lost through the head and hands.
  • Limit the amount of time spent playing outdoors to safe intervals, and bring children inside periodically to warm up.
  • Remove all wet clothing immediately and change to dry clothes if going back outdoors.
  • Wear sunscreen on all exposed skin to guard against burns from bright sunlight and snow glare.
  • Do not permit children to play outdoors in poor weather such as snowstorms, extreme cold or high winds.
  • Wear brightly colored outer clothing that is easily seen from a distance.
  • Do not dress children in winter wear with drawstrings – they can cut off circulation and make frostbite a greater threat, and loose drawstrings may present a strangulation hazard.
  • Teach children to avoid playing near snowplow areas.
  • Do not permit children to dig snow tunnels or forts that may collapse and bury them.
  • Avoid snowball fights that can lead to injuries from dangerous projectiles.
  • Keep roofs, gutters and awnings free from snow and icicle buildup that could collapse and injure a child. Similarly, do not permit children to pull icicles from the roof.
  • Teach children never to touch or lick exposed metal (fences, flagpoles, etc.) in winter.
  • Do not allow children to eat snow. It may contain pollutants, dirt, fecal matter or other contaminants, and the cold snow can chill a young child’s body to dangerous levels.
  • Regularly de-ice or sand sidewalks, driveways, patios and other areas where children may play.

Winter Sports

Winter sports can be a great way for children to stay active and enjoy colder temperatures, but each sport presents its own unique hazards. These winter safety tips for children can help them enjoy sports safely and comfortably.

  • Always use proper safety equipment and gear, including sports goggles and helmets, while playing winter sports.
  • Engage in safe sports behavior such as following the rules of the game and eliminating horseplay that can lead to accidents and injuries.
  • Enroll children in lessons from a qualified professional for advanced winter sports such as figure skating, skiing and snowboarding to ensure they learn safe techniques.
  • Only play winter sports in safe, approved locations rather than using seemingly frozen ponds, unknown hillsides or other potentially dangerous locations.

Staying Healthy

The long days of winter often keep children indoors, which can lead to hours of inactivity. Furthermore, children are more likely to contract illnesses during the winter months because they are in more confined spaces. To stay healthy during the winter, consider these safety tips:

 

 Eat a healthy, balanced diet that includes fruits and vegetables.

  • Teach children proper hand-washing techniques to kill germs and bacteria or use hand sanitizer if necessary.
  • Keep children home from school and other public places if they are sick.
  • Ask a pediatrician about the necessity for flu vaccines for young children.

Holiday Safety Tips

The holidays are a time of fun and excitement, but they can also be dangerous. Inappropriate toys, indulgent foods and unsafe decorations can create hazards that may cause injuries to children of all ages. These safety tips can help avoid the greatest risks:

  • Do not use “candy” style ornaments or holiday decorations that may fool young children.
  • Limit the amount of holiday sweets and treats children are allowed to eat.
  • Choose unbreakable ornaments for safe tree decorations, and be sure no ornaments are small enough to be swallowed.
  • Only give age-appropriate toys and gifts to children.
  • Check toy recall notices for any holiday gift items.

Heating Tips

The natural reaction to falling temperatures is to raise the heat, either through external, supplemental heaters or by turning on a fireplace or other open flames. These safety tips can keep away the winter chill without risk:

  • Keep candles, kerosene lamps, and other open flames out of reach of children at all times.
  • Do not put a space heater in a child’s room.
  • Teach children fire safety procedures, including how to spot potential hazards.
  • Do not allow children to play in fires such as roasting marshmallows in a fireplace.
  • Practice family fire drills to reinforce safe behavior.
  • Do not use electric blankets for young children.

 

The American Academy of Pediatrics has some valuable tips on how to keep your children safe and warm during the winter months.

What to Wear

      Several thin layers will keep them dry and warm. Don’t forget warm boots, gloves, mittens and a hat.

        Here’s a tip for older babies and young children is to dress them in one more layer of clothing that an adult would wear in the same conditions.

Hypothermia

      Hypothermia develops when a child’s temperature falls below normal due to exposure to colder temperature. It often happens when a youngster is playing outdoors in extremely cold weather without proper clothing or when clothes get wet. It can occur more quickly in children than in adults.

        Call 911 if you suspect hypothermia, until help arrives take the child indoors, remove any wet clothing and him/her in blankets or warm clothes.

Frostbite

      Frostbite happens when the skin and outer tissues become frozen. This condition tends to happen on extremities like the fingers, toes, ears, and nose. They may become pale, gray, and blistered.

        If frostbite occurs, bring the child indoors and place the frostbitten parts of his/her body in warm water (NOT HOT). Warm washcloths may be applied to frostbitten nose, ears, and lips.

Winter Health

      Cold weather does not cause colds or flu. But the viruses that cause colds and flu tend to be more common in the winter, when children are in school and are in closer contact with each other. Frequent hand washing and teaching your child to sneeze or cough into the bend of her/his elbow may reduce the spread of colds and flu.

Winter Sports and Activities

      Set reasonable time limits on outdoor play to prevent hypothermia and frostbite. Have children come inside periodically to warm up.

        Ice Skate on approved surfaces only and never skate alone.

Children should be supervised while sledding and consider having your child wear a helmet while sledding.

Sledding feet first or sitting up, instead of lying down head-first, may prevent head injuries.

Snowboarding

        Equipment should fit the child. Skiers should wear safety bindings that are adjusted at least every year. Snowboarders should wear gloves with built-in wrist guards. Eye protection or goggles should also be used.

Sun Protection

      The sun’s rays can still cause sunburn in the winter, especially when they reflect off snow. Make sure to cover your child’s exposed skin with sunscreen.